Down the TBR Hole #5

My Goodreads TBR needs desperately to be cleaned out, so I’m doing these posts until I feel it’s manageable, or until I’m back at the beginning of the list.

The Rules

  • 1. Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  •  2. Order on ascending date added.
  •  3. Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books.
  •  4. Read the synopsis of the books.
  •  5. Time to Decide: keep it or should it go

I’m adding my own twist on this and adding a 6th piece: if I’m on the fence about a book after reading the synopsis, I’ll read the preview of a book and make that part of my decision.

Onto the books.

The Luminaries

#1 The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton

[Goodreads Link]

So, there was a time in my life where books like this were almost all I wanted to read, but I’ve realized since then that my tastes are not what books like this require of a reader. Frankly, books like this just don’t entice me like they used to, and the fact that it’s over 800 pages means I’d have to be convinced I’d love it to even pick it up, and the fact is that… I’m not convinced, so.

Verdict: LET GO

Far from the Tree

#2 Far From the Tree by Robin Benway

[Goodreads Link]

Okay, so, this isn’t at all my usual taste in reading material, but it is one I was interested in because I love reading about families. I read the first couple pages of the preview because the synopsis had me on the fence, and it definitely seems like something I’d like to read, so.

Verdict: KEEP

Milkman

#3 Milkman by Anna Burns

[Goodreads Link]

I’ve seen reviews of this book that have been all over the place. Books that people either love or hate with little in between do usually intrigue me, if only to find out on which side of the spectrum I’ll fall. It’s been awhile since I thought about this book (I think probably since I added it to by Goodreads in March) but the synopsis is definitely something that intrigues me a little bit. This will likely be a book I get from the library if I end up picking it up, but I don’t think I’m willing to part with it from my Goodreads TBR just yet.

Verdict: KEEP

The Silence of the Girls

#4 The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker

[Goodreads Link]

Listen, myth and legend and fairy tale retellings are my jam. I’m not really one to read a lot of retellings of the popular stories like Cinderella and Snow White because those have been done to death and I just don’t like reading the same thing over and over, but the only retelling I’ve read of The Iliad is Madeline Miller’s The Song of Achilles which is one of my favorite books of all time. Briseis is a character that intrigued me in that retelling and the fact that Pat Barker has decided to give her her own story and her own voice in The Silence of the Girls? Sign me the fuck up. Honestly, why the fuck haven’t I read this yet?

Verdict: KEEP

If We Were Villains

#5 If We Were Villains by M.L. Rio

[Goodreads Link]

Okay, so, I am not a fan of comparison marketing at all. I have been let down too many times (The Devouring Gray being compared to The Raven Cycle), or I’ve loved the books and actually decided they were unfairly marketed as being for fans of a series it’s not at all like (The Magicians being compared to Harry Potter.) So, the fact that this book is compared to The Secret History has me intrigued and somewhat hesitantly optimistic, but it also has me thinking it either won’t be anywhere as good or else won’t be anything like it. I do plan on giving this a chance, but I have recently seen some negative reviews of it that have me second-guessing that choice so I may decide against reading it in the future.

Verdict: KEEP (for now)

So, in total I’m keep 4 books and letting go of 1. This has been a very… slow cleaning process of my Goodreads shelves. Maybe I’ll get lucky and hit a jackpot soon and get rid of 5 books in one go? But probably not.

Review: ‘Salem’s Lot by Stephen King

'Salem's Lot

Genre: Horror

Publisher: Anchor

Date Published: October 7, 1975

My Rating: ★★★★☆

When I read a book that a good chunk of people agree is one of the scariest they’ve ever read, I expect it to be scary. And ‘Salem’s Lot got a lot of people’s votes for being King’s scariest novel, with a good chunk of people admitting to it being one of the scariest books they’ve ever read.

Two notes: First, I admittedly cannot compare the scariness of this book to any of King’s other works because this is the first book of his I’ve ever read. Second, I read a lot of this during the day time, and everyone knows that horror is best read at night when everyone else is asleep, but what can I say? I’m a morning and day reader. Evening and night are for video games or Netflix.

‘Salem’s Lot is a book about vampires, and an old creepy house, but more than that it’s about a town. ‘Salem’s Lot or just The Lot is how the locals refer to Jersalem’s Lot, Maine.

Writer Ben Mears returns to The Lot as an adult, after having spent a short part of his childhood there, at the same time that the Marsten House, the site of a murder-suicide and known to the town for being creepy as hell, gets bought by two men who plan to open an antiques shop in the town. Shortly after his arrival, things start getting weird. Two boys disappear in the woods, and only one returns home. From there, the story takes off.

I really enjoyed this book, and it was a great read for the month of October, what with the main antagonist being a vampire. It did make me want to play the Sims and create some vampire sims or re-watch Castlevania.

There are a couple of scenes here that are creepy, and after reading the prologue you know only two of the main cast likely survives the goings-on in town, and I did feel a lot of anticipation for what would happen to all the characters. I felt particularly attached to Matt Burke and Father Callahan, despite knowing they probably wouldn’t make it to the end.

Otherwise, though, I didn’t feel as scared as I expected to after all the people who said this book was actually scary. It is scary, of course, but not in the way I was expecting, outside of a few dark scenes at the beginning of the book.

The way vampirism spreads through the town reminds one of a disease. It’s like reading a story set during the black plague, not knowing who’s going to catch it next, but knowing that not everyone will make it out alive.

It’s not scary in as gory of a way as others in the genre might be. Sure, there is some gore, but the bulk of that takes place in the last part of the book. I didn’t mind this, and the anticipation of what was going to happen to each of the characters kept me turning the pages- most days I read over 100 pages at a time.

The characters are what really shine. There wasn’t a single member of the main cast that I disliked. Mark Petrie was probably my favorite of them, but I liked Ben, Matt, Susan, and Father Callahan. I didn’t feel like I had enough time with Jimmy to care about what happened to him all that much- and when it did happen I felt worse for Mark.

As for the writing itself, there were scenes where the writing really shined- the scenes at the beginning that actually made me feel a little scared are the best example of this. But for most of the book the writing ranged from good to fine. There were some places that I ended up skimming because there was a little too much description of things that didn’t have anything to do with the plot.

I really enjoyed this book, and I may end up changing my rating up to 5-stars, depending on how I feel about this book after I’ve a week or so to digest it. I would highly recommend this, and it’s the perfect time of year to read it, so if you haven’t I suggest picking it up.

Q3 DNFs Wrap Up

This is just a list of some of the books I tried in Q3 that I ended up DNF’ing. If you don’t know, DNF stands for “did not finish.” There’s a variety of reasons I’ll DNF a book and I’ll get into some of them when I talk about why I DNF’ed these books in particular.

Side note: I was planning on making this a yearly thing, but I’ve DNF’ed a lot of books this year so I thought doing it quarterly might make more sense.

Without further ado, here are the books I DNF’ed in Q3 2019, in order of when I picked them up.

A Little Life

#1 A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

[Goodreads Link]

Yup, this is it: the book that caused a month-long reading slump. I really wanted to be someone who liked this book, but it was just… not pulling me in at all. I only ever read like 80-ish pages of it and then every time I thought to myself “I should read” after that, I had exactly 0 desire to pick this book up. I think I would have liked this more if I had read it around the same time as when I read Donna Tartt’s The Secret History, which I rated 5 stars at the time I read it, but which I’m hesitant to revisit as I don’t think I’d enjoy it as much now. Something about “literary” fiction just hasn’t been working for me lately, and I’m not going to force myself. I do hope to eventually get back to this one though!

Wicked Saints (Something Dark and Holy, #1)

#2 Wicked Saints by Emily A. Duncan

[Goodreads Link]

Some books, I leave the rating blank when I DNF them. Other times, I’ll give them one or two stars. It entirely depends on my reason for DNF’ing the book. I didn’t, for example, give a rating to A Little Life. I did, however, give a rating to Wicked Saints, because it was genuinely bad, and I wanted my thoughts about that to be reflected. I went into detail about why I DNF’ed this book here. If you just want the TL;DR version it’s that the writing was atrocious, nothing was explained, and in the 100+ pages that I managed to read, the author gave me no reason to care about the plot or the characters. Let’s just say I’m glad I got this book from the library because it would have been a waste of money.

Binti (Binti, #1)

#3 Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

[Goodreads Link]

I honestly just wasn’t connecting with this one. Conceptually, I liked the plot and the world and the characters, but I wasn’t feeling much about any of it. I also felt like things were moving too fast and not explained well enough. This book only has 90 or so pages but I just had a hard time getting past the fact that the MC sees a whole ship of people who have become her friends get murdered and then she’s all buddy-buddy with said murderers without question because they didn’t kill her and they actually like her for some reason. I don’t know. I felt like it didn’t make any sense, so I just stopped listening to the audiobook after that. I think, maybe, it was trying to do everything that a full novel would do, but in novella length.

Sawkill Girls by Claire Legrand

#4 Sawkill Girls by Claire Legrand

[Goodreads Link]

Technically I DNF’ed this at the beginning of this month, so it’s not a Q3 DNF, but… semantics. Who cares? Not me. This one is another one that I went into depth about my reasons for DNF’ing over on my Goodreads. If you want the whole list of grievances, you can read about it here. Unfortunately this book was just boring. How can horror be boring? Out of all the genres that shouldn’t be boring, I’d say horror is probably at the top of the list. I’m in the minority about this one, for sure, but it’s convinced me to just not bother with YA horror from now on. The Diviners series is scarier than this book, and I wouldn’t even call that series ‘horror.’ I’m going to stick to adult horror for the foreseeable future, and we can all thank this book for that.

Let me know if there’s any books you’ve DNF’ed recently.

Review: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

The Calculating Stars (Lady Astronaut, #1)

Genre: Science Fiction

Publisher: Tor Books

Date Published: July 3, 2018

My Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

Normally, I don’t like having to defend my opinions on books. After all, there’s no accounting for personal taste. But, I do feel like I have to defend my position here a little bit. First, there’s a couple things you should know about me before reading my review of this book. First, I’m a feminist. Second, I have a degree in physics. Also, Hidden Figures is one of my favorite movies of all time.

So I’m fairly sure that this book was written for someone like me. I was convinced before starting this book that it was going to be a 5-star read, maybe 4-stars if there was some flaws or it didn’t emotionally connect because how could a book about women in a space program eventually living in space possibly disappoint me that badly?

Well, it managed to disappoint me that badly. And I’ll tell you how.

Per usual I’ll start with writing style. The writing of this book isn’t bad per se, but I also wouldn’t call it good. It’s fairly mediocre. On top of that it’s written in first person which generally isn’t my cup of tea to begin with. I do understand why the first person choice was made though, so I’m not going to dock points for that. Anyway, the writing style never really shines anywhere, but it really flounders during the sex scenes between the main character and her husband. Like, those were so bad I had to pretty much skip over them because I wouldn’t have been able to keep going… luckily they were mostly short and fade to black.

Overall, it’s readable as a writing style, but in my opinion it borders on too simplistic. And that’s coming from someone who generally likes more straightforward styles over poetic and flowery ones.

I also had trouble connecting to the characters, including the main character which shouldn’t at all be an issue in a first person narrative. Writing in first person can often be a crutch for novice writers who don’t know how to portray a character’s thoughts or experiences without using the word ‘I’ but that wasn’t the issue here. The issue was that I straight-up didn’t like Elma. I couldn’t find her relatable- which, as a woman with a physics degree is probably the last thing the author was aiming for- and in fact I found her selfish, annoying, and too fucking perfect.

The least relatable thing about Elma is that she’s so smart that no one else can match her. She went to college at 14. She does math in her head. Oh, you have to solve differential equations with a piece of paper and a pencil? You’re actually a dumbass in comparison. This annoyed me to no end because even the smartest people I knew in my own physics program worked through the math on paper. Maybe there are people out there who can do linear algebra no problem in their head, but they’re few and far between, and they’re far from the average woman in physics, I’ll tell you that.

In fairness, I generally hate stories about exceptional main characters. I have this problem with fantasy novels, too, where the MC has to put in essentially no work to master things others have put years and years into practicing. I just find it really hard to root for characters who have it easy. Which, when we’re talking about a woman physicist in the 1950s, even a genius like Elma shouldn’t have it easy, right? I think Hidden Figures did a much better job of portraying this, and I actually liked all the main characters in that movie. This book, though, had me rolling my eyes.

The biggest obstacle that Elma faces throughout this novel has nothing to do with her gender at all. It’s her anxiety. Honestly the amount of time spent talking about how she has such bad anxiety in front of reporters and cameras and how it makes her throw up really came at the expense of the actual plot of the novel and the feminist narrative. Elma is a woman physicist in the 1950s and this is the biggest obstacle we could come up with for her to face?

Then there’s her husband Nathaniel. I was hoping we’d get a realistic look at marriage in the 1950s, but instead Nathaniel’s traits boil down to he’s an engineer and he’s Jewish. Other than that he has no personality, no motivations outside of supporting everything his wife does including when she forgets to pay the electric bill, and he has absolutely no agency. Their relationship is so unrealistic. Even the most supportive of couples will argue once in a while. Even the healthiest of couples don’t agree on everything. Yet, Elma forgets to pay the electric bill (which she always does because she can do math in her head and Nathaniel can’t) and Nathaniel barely bats an eyelash about it.

The other supporting characters honestly aren’t even worth mentioning, except for Parker. I found him genuinely interesting, but we’re supposed to hate him because he’s trying to keep Elma on the ground and out of outer-space. The only male character in the whole book with agency is, of course, the antagonist.

Writing a feminist book doesn’t mean that the only male characters with agency should be antagonists and that male significant others or romantic interests should be some robot-like unquestioning domestic servant following you around like a puppy-dog.

This is the second book I’ve picked up in less than a month where the feminism part of the story was something I was excited about and then disappointed me greatly. I am a feminist. This does not mean I think only female characters should have any type of agency, or that the only male characters with agency should be on the side of the patriarchy. Ideally, men and women characters should be equally well-developed. In my own experiences, sure men were the causes of some of my biggest problems in my undergrad career in physics. But there were other men who were some of my best friends, some of my biggest allies, and even one I considered to be a mentor. This lack of nuance in “feminist” stories is starting to get on my nerves. Granted, if you can’t develop your main female character, expecting a well-developed cast of supporting characters male and female is probably expecting too much.

Additionally, there’s such a heavy-handed attempt to show Elma off as super woke. This would be fine if it felt natural, but it doesn’t. It’s forced and it’s a weird insertion of our current climate of progressive social values being projected onto a character living in the 1950s. Either way, it should have certainly been executed in a way that didn’t just amount to Dr. Martin Luther King’s name being dropped every other page. It was just as heavy-handed and lacking in nuance as the attempt at feminism.

Frankly, the author’s mediocre writing ability was just not good enough to pull off taking on these important topics.

Now there’s the plot. The plot, in this case, comes as less important than the heavy-handed feminism and Elma’s severe anxiety. Which is interesting, seeing as the plot is that’s it the end of the world and they have a limited amount of time to colonize other planets before the ocean starts to literally boil.

After the first section of the book when the meteorite strikes, which is high-action and actually intriguing, there’s a time-skip. After the time-skip it’s back to business as usual. There’s no sense of urgency, really, and that made it really hard for me to continue turning the pages. The pacing was so uncomfortably slow, but by the time I realized just how bad it was I only had 100 pages left in the damn book so I pushed through it.

We spend so much time on Elma’s anxiety and her problems with Stetson Parker that it’s almost like the fact that the habitable world is literally ending has been all but forgotten by the author. Which is unfortunate, because that’s the book I signed up to read, not a book about a woman with crippling stage-fright (but who also happens to be a natural on camera?)

I’ll save you some time. We don’t get to space until the last line of the book. What was the point of the 300-ish pages between that and the beginning of the time-skip? We don’t even spend a lot of time focusing on preparing for colonization of space in those pages.

I was going to give this book a generous 2 stars. But after writing all this I just realize that I’m so disappointed that I can’t bring myself to do it. This is a one-star read for me, and I wish it were the 5-stars I was expecting. If you’re looking for a story that empowers women in STEM and has important themes of equality, just watch Hidden Figures. If you’re looking for a story about going to space or the end of the world, find some other sci-fi novel.

This ain’t it.

Q3 Reading Stats | Q4 Goals

This has been a slow reading season for me. It started with a slump that carried over from Q2. I tried for a whole month just to finish one book before finally deciding to DNF it. So my real Q3 for reading didn’t even start until August, so I only read 8 books in total.

I’ve discussed the books I read in my wrap ups for the months.

Q3 Wrap-Ups:

In total I read 8 books for a total of 2,953 pages. In comparison, my Q2 total was 15 books and 5,565 pages. That’s… less than spectacular… but on the whole, I’m okay with it. It probably would have been closer to even if I hadn’t spent a whole month trying to force myself to read one book.

The average length of the books I read this quarter was 369 pages, compared to 371 pages in Q2, so more or less the same. There was a significantly larger standard deviation with that average this quarter, though.

I read more fantasy than any other genre, which isn’t surprising for me. Fantasy tends to be my go-to genre, and it tends to be at least 50% of what I read in any given period of time.

I read more female authors than male authors, which is slightly surprising for me as I didn’t read much YA this quarter. In fact the only YA book I did read was by a male author. I probably shouldn’t be surprised by that, and it definitely draws attention to my own biases about the adult and YA categories.

My average rating for Q3 was 3.5, which is a little above my all-time ratings average. Not something I’ll complain about. That means I generally enjoyed the books I read this quarter.

I had an oddly even spread of ratings this quarter, with the exception of 1-stars, which I gave to 0 of the books I read.

In general I think my average ratings have been trending higher since I started allowing myself to DNF books I’m not enjoying. I don’t give ratings to books I DNF and most of them (with the exception of library returns) would probably be 1-star, or 2 if I’m in a good mood. The thing is, I just don’t get a lot of enjoyment out of hate-reading. I love to be salty, but with the little time I have available to read, I just prefer to spend my time on things I actually like.

That said, I have written some salty things about some books I’ve DNF’ed recently and in the further past. In Q3 I DNF’ed a total of 3 books. (Two physical books and one audiobook.) I always post my reasons for DNF’ing a book to my Goodreads.


Looking to Q4. My main goal is to keep with at least the 4 books a month that I managed in August and September.

Some other goals I have for myself:

  • I want to read at least 2 horror books in October (not counting the audiobook I’m listening to now, because it’s not nearly horrifying enough for me to even really call it ‘horror’, but I’ll leave that for when I write a review of it.)
  • I want to read at least 5 of the books I already own. I currently have a stack of 13 unread books sitting on my shelf, and I’d like to read at least half of those before I bring in anything new. (I know that’s not too crazy, but considering half of what I read comes from the library, it takes me awhile to get to the books I actually own.)
  • I’d like to finish at least 1 series that I’ve been putting off.
  • And I want to start at least 1 new series I’ve been putting off.

Again, my main goal is to read at least 4 books each month in Q4, which means I’ll have read another 12 books by the end of the year. That being said, I’ve already more this year than I have in a long time, so I am not at all going to stress myself out over hitting any of these goals.

If you have any similar end-of-year goals, I’d love to hear them!

September Wrap Up

I read four books in the month of September, which is a pretty decent number for me and my schedule. It’s about the average for me.

I also rated two books 5-stars, which is fairly rare for me, so I’m pretty excited about the books I ended up picking up.

(On a slightly negative note, I did end up DNF’ing one book. I generally don’t care about DNF’ing books they generally either bore me or I can tell from the get-go I’m not going to like them, and I don’t force myself to read things, but if you’re interested I always mention why I DNF certain books on my Goodreads. I don’t mention them by title in my wrap-ups.)

I’m just gonna jump into the books in the order that I read them.

The Queen of Blood (The Queens of Renthia, #1)

The Queen of Blood (The Queens of Renthia #1) by Sarah Beth Durst

Page Count: 353

My Rating: ★★★★☆

[Goodreads Link]

This book was such a nice surprise. I wasn’t sure what to expect going into it, and I don’t even remember how I found out that this book existed, and I’m so surprised it’s not more popular, especially among people who read YA Fantasy (though this book is technically adult, there’s definitely a lot of appeal for those who generally read YA.) I felt so strongly about this book deserving more popularity that I wrote a full review on it, which you can read here.

Gods of Jade and Shadow

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Page Count: 352

My Rating: ★★★☆☆

[Goodreads Link]

I really loved the premise of this and it definitely kept me entertained while I was bored at work. However I don’t think I was able to absorb all of it as well as I could have if I had read it physically, and I just had to like force myself to pay attention to the audiobook. This happens a lot with audiobooks for me, I use them as background noise and then accidentally tune out huge swaths of them, so I’m trying to only listen to them when I can focus on them like while I’m driving or cleaning so that I stop that habit. Anyways, I don’t think this one will be super memorable for me down the line, but I did enjoy it while I read it. I liked the dynamic between the two main characters and the focus on Mayan mythology.

The Hero of Ages (Mistborn, #3)

The Hero of Ages (Mistborn #3) by Brandon Sanderson

Page Count: 572

My Rating: ★★★★★

[Goodreads Link]

This book took me nearly 3 weeks to complete, but man was it worth it. Everything about this series is so immensely well-done. The Mistborn series is not the best with pacing, which is my only complaint and one I’m entirely willing to overlook for how it ended. There’s not much I can say about this book that wouldn’t spoil things that happen earlier in the series, but holy shit. I just loved this so much, these books will always be at the top of my fantasy list, and I’m excited to dive further into Sanderson’s Cosmere universe.

Everything I Never Told You

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Page Count: 292

My Rating: ★★★★★

[Goodreads Link]

I don’t read a lot of contemporary. I don’t read a lot of generally plot-less, 100% character-focused fiction. I don’t like a lot of the ones that I do read. But every once in a while I come across one that reminds me why I keep on reading them, and this was one of those rare cases. This book has a loose plot, but it’s less a story and more a study on grief, but even more than that it’s a portrait of a family. This touches on not only grief, but racism and sexism, both without forcing the point down your throat. It’s also about love, both romantic and familial, of the complicated relationships between siblings. I loved all three of the siblings. I related the most to Nath out of all the characters, empathized most with Hannah, and cried most over Lydia. I don’t know that I have the words to describe all the things I felt through reading this book, even though took me less than a day to read it. I have a feeling that this is one of those books that’ll never leave me and I’m very glad I read it.

That’s it for September! I’m hoping to read at least 4 books (but maybe more) in October, and I’m excited for that, because it’s spooky month, and I’ve never really been into horror as a genre, but I’ve always been intrigued, and this is the year I’m going to give it a chance- I already have a tentative TBR- and I’m excited to really dive into it.

Down the TBR Hole #2

My Goodreads TBR needs desperately to be cleaned out, so I’m doing these posts twice a month until I feel it’s manageable, or until I’m back at the beginning of the list.

The Rules

  • 1. Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  •  2. Order on ascending date added.
  •  3. Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books.
  •  4. Read the synopsis of the books.
  •  5. Time to Decide: keep it or should it go

I’m adding my own twist on this and adding a 6th piece: if I’m on the fence about a book after reading the synopsis, I’ll read the preview of a book and make that part of my decision.

Now that I’ve gotten all that out of the way, let’s just get started.

Memoirs of a Geisha

#1 Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden

[Goodreads Link]

Now, I suspect that I could get a lot from this book if I read it. However, something about a white American man writing a book from the perspective of a Japanese Geisha is a little off-putting to me, and on top of that, a lot of the more ‘literary’ books I’ve tried recently have either felt underwhelming or have bored me to tears, so…

VERDICT: GO

The Girl in the Tower (Winternight Trilogy, #2)

#2 The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden

[Goodreads Link]

I loved The Bear and the Nightingale when I read it back in 2018. I already own this book in hardback, I’ve just been waiting for the seasons to shift to pick it up. Likely I’ll be reading this in December or January.

VERDICT: KEEP

A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1)

#3 A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

[Goodreads Link]

If the Villains series is anything to go by, V.E. Schwab is a good writer but not necessarily my favorite. I have my criticisms of both of those books, but I still enjoyed reading them. The premise of this is so-so for me, I’m not big on multiple-world type stories or low fantasy in particular, however it is still intriguing enough that I do want to eventually give it a shot. That said, if I go through my TBR again and I still haven’t read it, it could go either way.

VERDICT: KEEP

The Golem and the Jinni (The Golem and the Jinni, #1)

#4 The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

[Goodreads Link]

After re-reading the Goodreads summary for this I’m reminded of how good it sounds and wondering why I haven’t read it yet. Seriously, what’s the deal @ me? That’s another good part of doing posts like these; they’re a good push to read something I should have read ages ago.

VERDICT: KEEP

The Bone Clocks

#5 The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

[Goodreads Link]

Almost three years ago now, I read Slade House— not realizing it was a companion to this book– and loved it. After putting that down and learning that it was related to this novel I had to add this to my TBR. Slade House isn’t a book I think about a lot these days, but I do remember immensely enjoying the story, plus this book is sitting on my shelf already… it’s just a thick ass book, so I’ve been putting off committing to it.

In total I am keeping 4 books and letting go of` 1. Definitely not as much of a dent as I was hoping to make, but there’s always next time.