Anticipated 2020 Releases

With 2020 just around the corner, I’m thinking about books I’m excited for the release of. There are definitely a handful I’m looking forward to and I hope to get to them soon after their release.

The King of Crows (The Diviners, #4)

The King of Crows by Libba Bray

This is the fourth installment of the The Diviners series; a series I love for what it is on its own as well as for being the most spectacularly narrated audio books I’ve ever listened to. I’m serious, this series has ruined audio books for me because I’ve struggled to find others that live up to the standard this has set in my mind.

I’m excited to return to this world and these characters and I’m even more excited for an audio book that will make my commute not suck.

Woven in Moonlight

Woven in Moonlight by Isabel Ibanez

This is a YA Fantasy that pulls inspiration from Bolivian politics and history, and I am so here for that type of diversity in the Fantasy genre. The main character is a stand-in for the Condesa.

It seems like it will have a lot of political intrigue going on in a fantasy setting, and I’m really looking forward to the setting especially in this one. I have no idea how it will affect the types of magic we see playing out in this book, but either way I’m excited to find out.

The Ancestor

The Ancestor by Danielle Trussoni

This book caught my eye on a Goodreads list for 2020 literary fiction. Two of the shelves for this book are “gothic” and “horror,” so there’s no way I’d pass up something like this.

It sounds like there’s a lot of family history and family secrets going on based off the synopsis of this book, and potentially something… supernatural? I’m really intrigued by this one and I definitely will be keeping an eye on reviews as it’s release approaches.

Sin Eater

Sin Eater by Megan Campisi

After committing a crime, the main character in this novel is sentenced to become a “Sin Eater,” defined in the synopsis as “a shunned woman, brutally marked, whose fate is to hear the final confessions of the dying, eat ritual foods symbolizing their sins as a funeral rite, and thereby shoulder their transgressions to grant their souls access to heaven.” A mystery later ensues when someone leaves a deer heart on a coffin despite the deceased person not having confessed to the sin it represents, and another Sin Eater is killed for refusing to eat it.

I am rarely excited for historical fiction that isn’t either paranormal or fantasy as well, but this just sounds too good to gloss over.

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes (The Hunger Games, #0)

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins

This is probably on the list of everyone who read The Hunger Games back in the day. I myself was obsessed with the series when I was in high school when all the movies started coming out and everyone who had a mild interest in books was reading them. And I do like that this new book is not a continuation of a long-over series, as many other long not-awaited series installments of late have been, but that it is a side story about a side character.

I will definitely be reading this book when it comes out and I really hope it reminds me of that time that I was so invested in The Hunger Games series.

Mexican Gothic

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

I read Gods of Jade and Shadow in 2019 and was very pleasantly surprised by it. My rating of it on Goodreads sits at a 3-star right now, but it’s definitely one that I deliberated on and my real feelings sit between a 4 than a 3, and I think I might have enjoyed more had I read a physical copy rather than listened to the audio book since it is so hard for me to connect with audio books most of the time for some reason.

That said, I really enjoyed what she did with her last book and I look forward to what she does with Mexican Gothic, which is about a debutante on a mission to rescue her newly-wed cousin.

The Deep

The Deep by Alma Katsu

This is a historical fiction about The Titanic, and I never thought I’d have two historical fiction novels on this list when it’s the genre I read the least from overall. But this has a horror twist and I absolutely love it.

Basically What if the Titanic was haunted? is definitely a great story idea and I’m ready to eat that up. I’ve been saying for at least a year (probably more like two years) that I want to read more horror, and a horror novel about the Titanic sounds like just the thing I’d want to pick up.

Those are the titles I’m most excited for in 2020, but they certainly aren’t the only 2020 releases I have my eye on. What are the books you’re most looking forward to being released in the new year?

Down the TBR Hole #7

My Goodreads TBR needs desperately to be cleaned out, so I’m doing these posts until I feel it’s manageable, or until I’m back at the beginning of the list.

The Rules

  • 1. Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  •  2. Order on ascending date added.
  •  3. Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books.
  •  4. Read the synopsis of the books.
  •  5. Time to Decide: keep it or should it go

I’m adding my own twist on this and adding a 6th piece: if I’m on the fence about a book after reading the synopsis, I’ll read the preview of a book and make that part of my decision.

Ghost Wall

#1 Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss

[Goodreads Link]

Okay, I was on the fence about this, and I read a few pages of the preview and actually find the writing style very much up my alley as well as the pulling me into the story. It’s definitely not in my usual genre or within my usual tastes, but I often need a break from my usual choices, so I’ll be keeping this one for when I’m in need of a breath of fresh air.

VERDICT: KEEP

Gingerbread

#2 Gingerbread by Helen Oyeyemi

[Goodreads Link]

Okay, full disclosure, I think this has the lowest average rating of anything on my Goodreads TBR right now. I know literary fiction tends to get rated lower on average, but this only has a 3.07. Most books I like are at least a 3.8, so that alone has me questioning whether this book is worth it. No one I’m following on Goodreads has read this, and normally that wouldn’t bother me, but the fact that this has such a low average rating makes me want to read a review from soemeone whose tastes I’m familiar enough with that I’d be able to tell whether this book is for me. However, because I have so many books on my TBR, this has such a low rating, and my overall hesitation about it… I’m just gonna go with my gut on this.

VERDICT: LET GO

My Lovely Wife

#3 My Lovely Wife by Samantha Downing

[Goodreads Link]

This is a thriller, and I tend to not be super picky in what thrillers I pick up even if I am harder to please than average, just because they’re such a quick read and so it’s generally a pretty low risk to take a chance on them. If I don’t enjoy them I only wasted a couple days of reading time as opposed to a week or two. That and the premise of a married couple that murders together make this a no brainer.

VERDICT: KEEP

Little Fires Everywhere

#4 Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

[Goodreads Link]

Celeste Ng’s novel Everything I Never Told You is one of my favorite books of 2019. I rated it 5 whole stars. I don’t even need to re-read the synopsis of Little Fires Everywhere to know I’ll be reading it at some point. I really don’t have much else to say about that.

VERDICT: KEEP

My Sister, the Serial Killer

#5 My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

[Goodreads Link]

Frankly this book sounds too good to pass up. It’s basically a mix of a thriller and a family drama? I also know someone IRL who has read this and really enjoyed it, and normally when my real life friends read books I have to give those a chance because I’m not going to pass up the opportunity to talk about books with my friends.

VERDICT: KEEP

In total I’m keeping 4 and letting go of 1. Slowly but surely my TBR is getting a refresh, if not as quickly as I’d like. There are so many books I just want to delete off my TBR, but I’m trying to be good and do it systematically and give each book a fair chance. However, with over 400 books to get through it feels like it’s moving at a glacial pace.

Let’s Talk Bookish: Reading Outside Your Target Age Group

Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme hosted by Eternity Books. This is my first time participating, and I’m looking forward to participating in more of these in the future.

This week’s prompt is: Should readers read books that aren’t for their target age?

Examples of this are adults reading YA books, teens reading adult books, or children reading YA/adult books.

I’m of the general opinion that people should read whatever they like reading, regardless of whether they’re a member of the target demographic or not.

The exception to this might be children reading certain adult books. That said, far be it from me to police a child’s reading choices; that’s up to the parents. I don’t have kids nor do I ever want them, so I’m not going to touch this except to say that as a kid I was allowed to read whatever the hell I wanted, but I mostly stuck to my own age group by choice because I figured adult books would bore me. I wanted to read stories about kids doing exciting things. And, you know, I think I would have turned out fine even if I hadn’t stuck to those books.

In general I don’t see a reason to stick to one particular type of book just because you fit the target demographic.

Now, I might be biased. I occasionally read YA still even though I’m technically not a part of the target demographic (that said, is it just me or does the target YA audience seem to be trending older and older?) Heck, there are even some middle grade books that have piqued my interest. And in that same vein, I remember being a teen and not wanting to read YA anymore because I felt it was too juvenile (I feel like most readers go through a phase like this at some point) but I also didn’t want to read adult books because I had this idea in my mind that they’d be boring. Now that I’ve matured, I know that there are some juvenile YA books, but that’s not the whole landscape of YA, and there are some boring adult books, but that’s not the whole landscape of adult.

I think that there are a few different dynamics working to keep people reading only in a certain age group.

First, is the stereotypes associated with each grouping.

Some teens and young adults might think adult books are boring. I blame school for this. I myself have avoided the Classics genre like the plague since I finished school because it just reminds me of high school and being terribly bored and reading the sparks notes instead of the actual books for assignments, or else feeling like certain books were torture. To this day, I’ll tell anyone who listens about how much I hated the book Jane Eyre, though I occasionally wonder whether I’d have hated it as much had I read it on my own. There are books I had to read for school that I liked, but none that I loved. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein comes to mind as a book I liked but might have loved had I read it in my own time and in my own way.

It’s only now, 5 years post-high school, that I’m starting to think about reading any classics on my own.

On the other hand, YA books have a certain stigma to them (probably because they’re mostly enjoyed by young women and teenage girls, but that’s a topic for its own post.) On threads in book-related subreddits, I still see people referring to YA as a “genre” (which, isn’t the correct term, it’s literally just a way to group books with specific themes like coming-of-age stories) filled with vampire or paranormal romances, which 1.) isn’t even true these days, and hasn’t been the case for probably almost 10 years, and 2.) even if it were true why do people feel the need to shit on paranormal books or romance books? The people perpetuating this stigma often do not read YA, because if they did they’d realize that just like with adult books, YA books offer something for all readers.

That brings me to the second point, of people putting themselves into boxes.

People who answer this question and say that people should only read inside their own target age groups are probably adults who only read adult books. They’re on par with the pseudo-intellectuals from the book-related subreddits who turn up their nose at the mere mention of “Young Adult.” Some of them probably make wild claims of having been reading adult books since they were 5 years old to sound impressive.

At the end of the day, if you choose to only read books aimed at your age group that’s totally your choice. In my opinion, you’re just holding yourself back from reading more and from reading outside your comfort zone and maybe even from finding a new favorite book.

But whatever you personally choose to read shouldn’t dictate what everyone else decides to read.

Tome Topple TBR

Tome Topple is a readathon hosted by Sam from Thoughts on Tomes. This is the 9th round of the readathon, and the only rule is to read books over 500 pages, but there are other optional prompts. This round takes place from November 9 – November 22. Here is a link to the announcement video by Sam, and a link to the readathon’s twitter page.

I’ve picked 3 books just to be well-rounded (and because they’re all the books I own longer than 500 pages that I haven’t read yet, it’s very lucky that they happen to fit the prompts lol) but I’m only really planning on finishing one and if I get to a second one it’ll be like an extra successful tome topple for me.

The books I’m planning to choose from are:

#1 Leviathan Wakes by James S.A. Corey

This fills pretty much all the prompts except one, and it’s the one of these three books that I’m definitely planning on reading the entirety of for this readathon. This is an adult book, it’s a part of a series, and it’s has been on my TBR the longest. The only prompt it doesn’t fit is being in a genre I don’t normally pick up. I don’t read a lot of Sci-Fi, but I definitely read enough that it’s probably still in my top 5-10 genres overall. This is the book I’m prioritizing for this Tome Topple round, so if I only finish one book… it’ll be this.

#2 The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

This is another adult book that’s been on my TBR for a while, though not quite as long as Leviathan Wakes. It’s also a Sci-Fi/Fantasy book, so not in a genre I don’t normally read. I’m including this though just as a nudge at myself like… hey remember this book you were excited to buy like over a year ago and still haven’t touched? Remember that book? You should read it.

#3 A Little Life by Hanya Yanigahara

This is an adult book, and it’s literary fiction which isn’t something I read frequently. It’s not a genre I never read, but it is a genre I’ve been avoiding lately so I’m going to say that it counts for the prompt of a genre I don’t normally read. Last time I attempted to read this book it put me in a reading slump. I think that it might fit the mood of November better than it did the summer, though, so hopefully that won’t be a problem this time around. I’m planning on starting it from the beginning again for this readathon if I get around to picking it up again.

That’s it for my TBR! I’ll be lucky if I manage to finish one of these long books. If you’re participating in this round of Tome Topple, let me know what you’re planning to read for it in the comments!

Top Ten Tuesday: Books that Give Off Autumn Vibes

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, she comes up with the topics, and we pick the books.

The last one of these I participated in was way back in May, but I definitely plan on doing more of these… not every single one but definitely the topics I like.

Anyway, here are 10 books that give off autumn vibes, in no particular order.

Books I’ve read:

The Queen of Blood (The Queens of Renthia, #1)

The Queen of Blood (Queens of Renthia #1) by Sarah Beth Durst

[Goodreads Link]

The forest and the red, golden, and orange hues on this book definitely put it squarely in the “autumn vibes” category. This book is so good! The magic system in this book also involves different kinds of spirits, including forest spirits. I would highly recommend this book, and I have a dedicated review of my thoughts on it here.

The Wallcreeper

The Wallcreeper by Nell Zink

[Goodreads Link]

This orangey-red hues from the light streaming on the cover of this book definitely make me think of fall. As for the contents of the book itself, I… can’t tell you anything about my thoughts on it because I honestly feel extremely neutral towards this book. It’s a weird little book, that’s for sure. I also did a full review on this book here.

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson

[Goodreads Link]

Fall has been very rainy and dreary where I live this year, so this dreary cover definitely matches the vibes this fall has brought to Massachusetts. This book was okay. I don’t have much to say about it two months after reading it, and I didn’t do a full review of it but I did mention my 2.5 star rating when I finished it on Goodreads. I remember feeling decent about most of the book and then not liking the ending.

Windwitch (The Witchlands, #2)

Windwitch (Witchlands #2) by Susan Dennard

[Goodreads Link]

I think I’ve already mentioned this in another fall tag but… the oranges, the red robes, the leaves swirling around who I can only assume is Merik. Out of the 2 books and the 1 novella I’ve read of this series, Windwitch is my favorite. I’m hoping to read the next book in this series soon and hope the books continue to improve. I do recommend this series, even as my dislike for the main character definitely leaves a pervasive slight bad taste in my mouth. My love for all the other characters definitely makes up for it though.

The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1)

The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle #1) by Maggie Stiefvater

[Goodreads Link]

I keep going back and forth on whether I actually want to re-read this series or not. Part of me wants to before Call Down the Hawk comes out, but at the same time I feel like I remember it pretty well still, and I do remember this book being my least favorite of the series. I really didn’t like the prologue with all the “Blue always knew when she kissed her true love he would die” nonsense. I put the book down for over a month after I read that prologue because of it, before finally coming back and really enjoying the rest of the novel and all the novels that followed. I do think Blue is kind of a weak character, and Gansey is definitely a bargain bin Henry Winter, but I love Adam and Ronan so the next books that focus more on them are so much better, in my honest opinion. Still, this book has the big ass raven on the cover, which I guess is the theme of this post.


Books I want to read:

Six of Crows (Six of Crows, #1)

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

[Goodreads Link]

I’m honestly a little ashamed of the fact that I still haven’t read any Grishaverse books as of scheduling this post. I’m hoping to change that soon, just so I can get to this duology, which I fully expect I’ll love, but the cover definitely gives off mid-to-late fall vibes.

Alice (The Chronicles of Alice, #1)

Alice by Christina Henry

[Goodreads Link]

This is a retelling of the classic Alice in Wonderland. I love Alice in Wonderland, and I love retellings, but I am sick of seeing the same fairytales getting retellings over and over and over (Cinderella, Beauty and the Beast, etc.) so this is definitely one I’m looking forward to reading eventually.

An Enchantment of Ravens

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

[Goodreads Link]

This book has some mixed reviews which makes me a little nervous about whether or not I actually want to read it. I really like the sound of both Margaret Rogerson’s books but I’m just not sure where on the spectrum I’ll fall between loving and hating the writing itself. Anyway, the colors and the raven on the cover definitely make me think of fall.

The Ballad of Black Tom

The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle

[Goodreads Link]

I have no idea what time of year this book is supposed to take place, but the cover with the shadows and the dark alley makes me think of a chilly fall night, because it starts getting darker earlier and earlier in autumn- which is the only thing I don’t like about the season. I also think this is supposed to be horror? (It’s shelved as horror on Goodreads, anyway, which isn’t always the most accurate for listing genres.) Horror is definitely a genre I pick up more in fall, around Halloween especially.

The Graveyard Book

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

[Goodreads Link]

I think this is self-explanatory. Graveyards make me think of Halloween and Halloween takes place in fall. This is definitely a book that I’d be more likely to pick up in October or late September simply because of that.

Down the TBR Hole #6

My Goodreads TBR needs desperately to be cleaned out, so I’m doing these posts until I feel it’s manageable, or until I’m back at the beginning of the list.

The Rules

  • 1. Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  •  2. Order on ascending date added.
  •  3. Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books.
  •  4. Read the synopsis of the books.
  •  5. Time to Decide: keep it or should it go

I’m adding my own twist on this and adding a 6th piece: if I’m on the fence about a book after reading the synopsis, I’ll read the preview of a book and make that part of my decision.

Blanca & Roja

#1 Blanca & Roja by Anna-Marie McLemore

[Goodreads Link]

This is a YA retelling of Swan Lake with LGBT elements and that sounds right up my alley. As a dance nerd, I wish there were more retellings of stories that are famous ballets because some of them are so good and have so much potential. (I mean, honestly, how many Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast and Snow White retellings do we need? There are other– frankly more interesting– stories out there.) Anyways, this is for sure a book that I don’t want to forget about because I would like to eventually give it a chance.

VERDICT: KEEP

The Astonishing Color of After

#2 The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R. Pan

[Goodreads Link]

I have had mixed experiences with magical realism as a genre. But the overall story of this book, which is about grief and family and coming-of-age, makes me hope that this will be on that I connect with. I don’t tend to pick up many books like this in the fall/winter months, so maybe I’ll get around to it next Spring. Funny this was on my original Asian Readathon TBR back in May, I just sort of… failed miserably at that Readathon so. But yeah, in my own time, I’ll definitely get around to picking this up.

VERDICT: KEEP

Daisy Jones & The Six

#3 Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

[Goodreads Link]

This is a book I was excited about when it first came out, but since then I’ve heard multiple mixed reviews about it, and some of the less-than-perfect reviews have sort of made me wary. I do have the audiobook saved on Scribd so hopefully I eventually get around to this. But if a large amount of time goes by and I haven’t read this, I’m going to just cut my losses.

VERDICT: KEEP (for now)

Freshwater

#4 Freshwater by Awaeke Emezi

[Goodreads Link]

This is a book I added to my TBR when I was trying to get into literary fiction and I was (loosely) following a couple of awards. I believe I found this one through the Women’s Fiction Prize longlist. I have been trying to find a Nigerian author that I like, and have been unimpressed with the last couple I’ve tried, so almost for that alone I want to give this book a chance.

VERDICT: KEEP

Assassin's Apprentice (Farseer Trilogy, #1)

#5 Assassin’s Apprentice by Robin Hobb

[Goodreads Link]

Okay so this is actually fairly high on my priority lists as in it’s a book I haven’t yet bought or solidly committed to, but I regularly think about it and how I really want to give it a chance and hopefully fall in love with Robin Hobb’s writing and the whole Realm of the Elderling series. So with that in mind, there’s definitely no way I’m getting rid of this book.

VERDICT: KEEP

Once again I have kept 5 books and parted with 0. I’m hoping as we get further down my Goodreads TBR that I start to get into posts where I keep 0 books and get rid of 5 to make up for how little I’ve cut from my TBR so far.

Review: A Nearly Normal Family by M.T. Edvardsson

A Nearly Normal Family

Genre: Thriller

Publisher: Celadon Books

Date Published: June 25, 2019

My Rating: ★★★★

A Nearly Normal Family is a legal thriller that takes place after Stella Sandell is arrested for murder. It takes place in three parts, the first part of the book is from her father’s point-of-view, and then Stella’s, and in the end we get her mother’s. The book tries to explore whether members of the same family know each other as well as they think, and where the limits of loyalty lie.

I rated this five stars not because it’s flawless, because it’s not, but because it was the first book in a long time that had kept me captivated enough to finish it in one day, because it did everything it set out to do, and because I fell in love with the Swedish family at the center of it all.

This book is translated from Swedish, and so the writing is a tough thing to talk about. There are parts of the book where the language seems choppy and doesn’t flow perfectly, which would bug me a lot in a work that was originally written in English, but I don’t know the difficulties in translating Swedish to English and keeping all the nuances of the narrative intact, so I was willing to overlook it. Plus, it was a huge improvement from the last thriller and first-person narrative I read which was originally written in English and which I DNF’ed.

The plot itself is pretty typical for a legal thriller. There was a murder, a suspect is being tried, but did they do it? And if they did will they be found guilty?

Admittedly, one of the interesting parts of this book was reading about Swedish prisons and the legal system in place. I don’t think any country has found the magic formula for a fool-proof system, but it was interesting to read a story written by a Swedish man that touched on how things worked, what the general population in Sweden thinks about their own legal system, and how prisoners are treated. This is still a work of fiction though so everything I read was taken with a grain of salt.

The twists in the plot aren’t super unpredictable. They were fun, sure, but it wasn’t quite a roller-coaster. I didn’t mind that at all though, and I still enjoyed this immensely even if I did start to work it out for myself before the ending. Half the fun though is the anticipation of finally getting the confirmation of being right.

What really kept me reading, though, where the characters. The further you get into this the more you learn about the night of the murder and what happened leading up to it, but with each perspective you learn more and more about the family.

When you read from Adam’s perspective you think he’s just a protective father who loves his daughter, though some of his decisions were frustrating, part of me actually thought he was justified.

That being said, my favorite part of the book was the middle. Stella’s perspective because the most surprising part of the whole book was how much I liked her. I don’t want to give away too much, but, in my opinion she reads like a teenage girl, which isn’t a perspective I often find is done well by adult male authors.

I don’t want to say too much about what I liked about them because in a way, the twists are as much about the family and how we see each of its members as we find out more about what happened leading up to and in the aftermath of the murder as they are about the murder case itself.

I’m hoping that this author continues to write and that his works continue to be translated into English because I’d love to read more of his stuff. Maybe the translations will lose their choppiness as time goes on as well.

I’d highly recommend this book, it’s one of my favorites that I’ve read in 2019.